This light is contagious... reach out & pass it on
Hello there! I'm Mona. 23. nursing/anthro. all-time ramblings. borrowed pictures. cluttered thoughts. (un)ORIGINAL. enjoy :) guess who's back in town and happily engaged?! now to pass the NCLEX...
This light is contagious... reach out & pass it on
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etoilesbrillentencoreplus:

Fiance helping me with my dress
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a-state-of-bliss:

Giorgio Armani Fall/Wint 1993 - Amber Valletta by Peter Lindbergh
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"I am so sorry to all the people I hurt while I was hurting."
(via laurenraelle)
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bootsnblossoms:

femininefreak:

Gloria Steinem and Dorothy Pitman-Hughes, 1972 and 2014
Both by Dan Bagan

Wanna see my cry like a baby? Ask me who these women were.
Hughes’ father was beaten nearly to death by the KKK when she was a kid, and what does she do? Become an activist to try and stop that from happening to other people. She raised money to bail civil rights protesters out of jail. She helped women get out of abusive situations by providing shelter for them until they got on their feet. She founded an agency that helped women get to work without having to leave their children alone, because childcare in the 1970s? Not really a thing. In fact, a famous feminist line in the 70s was “every housewife is one man away from welfare.”
Then she teamed up with Steinman to found the Women’s Action Alliance, which created the first battered women’s shelters in history. They attacked women’s rights issues through boots on the ground activism, problem solving, and communication. They stomped over barriers of race and class to meet women where they were: mostly mothers who wanted better for themselves and their children.
These are women are who I always wanted to be.
bootsnblossoms:

femininefreak:

Gloria Steinem and Dorothy Pitman-Hughes, 1972 and 2014
Both by Dan Bagan

Wanna see my cry like a baby? Ask me who these women were.
Hughes’ father was beaten nearly to death by the KKK when she was a kid, and what does she do? Become an activist to try and stop that from happening to other people. She raised money to bail civil rights protesters out of jail. She helped women get out of abusive situations by providing shelter for them until they got on their feet. She founded an agency that helped women get to work without having to leave their children alone, because childcare in the 1970s? Not really a thing. In fact, a famous feminist line in the 70s was “every housewife is one man away from welfare.”
Then she teamed up with Steinman to found the Women’s Action Alliance, which created the first battered women’s shelters in history. They attacked women’s rights issues through boots on the ground activism, problem solving, and communication. They stomped over barriers of race and class to meet women where they were: mostly mothers who wanted better for themselves and their children.
These are women are who I always wanted to be.
Album Art
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"Unlike some male fashion designers who love nothing more than to embellish, shackle and encase female bodies, de la Renta always put the woman first, once musing, “It’s only fashion when a woman puts it on.” His clothes, particularly the red carpet gowns he was famous for, were impossibly flattering and always highlighted the wearer rather than adorning or overpowering her."
Oscar de La Renta’s most important legacy isn’t his clothes — it’s his respect for women  (via micdotcom)
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